All posts by KC

Preparing for Winter Comfort in an RV

You will want to review these tips to optimize your comfort for RV living in freezing temperatures. Not only will you save money on energy costs and stay warmer, but you could also avoid water damage that can run into the thousands of dollars.

WATER LINES

When temperatures hit freezing, you have 2 options; fill your tanks and disconnect the hose or insulate and heat your hose.

Option 1 – Fill tank and disconnect

It’s the easiest option. Make sure that there is no water left in the hose or you may need to thaw it to use it.

Option 2 – Insulate and possibly heat your hose.

The connect point on the RV is a bit vulnerable You might eventually develop a leak there, but it’s generally easy to replace that part. I’d access that before choosing to hook up in freezing temps. Some newer RVs have the hose connect in an interior compartment which helps, but almost all older RVs connect on an exterior wall.

If you don’t thaw out during the day, then you will need a heated hose. This video explains the process. Here’s a possible solution you could buy

If you thaw out, then plain insulation might work. Remember to duct tape the seams! Here’s a link for 1/2 inch hose insulation.

IMPORTANT TIP: If you chose to connect a hose directly to your RV instead of using the tanks, it is very important to use a pressure regulator. This will help you avoid over pressurizing your plumbing and blowing your connections.

INSULATE WINDOWS AND DOORS

Insulating the windows and doors is the single most important thing you can do to keep the interior warm. There are several ways to insulate them: rigid foam insulation boards, Reflectix double sided mylar insulation, shrink wrap and blankets or towels.

You will also want to insulate your skylights. Heat rises and this will result in major heat loss if you don’t. For standard square skylights you can use vent cushions. For odd sizes, taping up some Reflectix double sided mylar insulation will help alot.

If you have an RV that is a C or A class, in other words, it has a drivers compartment, you will want to make insulting this area a high priority. (I left this typo intentionally cause it made me laugh!)

First step is to cover windshield with Reflectix. Then use blankets to seal the area between the living space and driving cab. This RVer illustrates the blanket technique which I don’t see recommended very often, but I promise it is valuable to keep warm. (For safety reasons I don’t recommend using indoor propane heaters that she showed in this video.)

To insulate your windows there are many options. My preference is a combination of Reflectix double sided mylar insulation and rigid foam board which I also use in the summer.

I will create a webpage specifically on how to do this suggested insulation type which is easily removed and the most effective.  Please check back again later. (I haven't seen anyone else use the technique I came up with and provide instructions.)

You can also use shrink wrap or kits like this if you want to maximize the amount of light coming in. However keep in mind that with this type of insulation in place you will not be able to open and close windows.

INSULATE UNDER RV

Want to make your RV feel pretty? Put a skirt on it!

Just kidding, the real question is, do you want your RV to stay warm? Besides insulating the windows, this is one of the best ways to save on energy costs and stay comfortable. It can also provide a bit more assurance of avoiding pipe damage from water that expands in the pipes when it freezes.

This author does a great job of explaining the step to insulate the bottom of your RV as well as some extra touches for a more pleasing aesthetic and durable solution. I plan on doing this over the holidays and using her instructions.

If you have slide outs, you will really want to insulate them. The cold winds can be easily felt on the interior. Use rigid foam board and then use Reflectix double sided mylar insulation and Reflectix tape in the harder to seal areas.

If you plan on traveling in the snow, it would be worthwhile to invest in something like Idaho Canvas Products has a huge selection of skirts that are customizable to the inch of your RV. These skirts can range be as much as $400, but well worth the investment during the winter.

If you are concerned that any part of your RV compartments are at risk of freezing you can get a heat monitor and remote to monitor it. I highly recommend getting this temperature clock because it comes with a remote you can place anywhere and you will use it all year.

Some people use a light bulb to heat a cold space. There are small portable space heaters are good for underbelly spaces that could freeze in extreme temperatures.

IMPORTANT TIP: If you use tape on the exterior of your RV, Goof-off will probably work to get adhesive off, but sometimes you could be left with a permanent mark, so proceed with caution.

WASTE WATER DRAIN

When temperatures hit freezing, you have 2 options; only release your grey and black water as necessary or insulate your waste water drain.

Option 1 – Release waste water when necessary.

This is the easiest option but requires you to periodically do a manual release.

Option 2 – Insulate your waste water drain.

If you chose to insulate under your RV (which is very highly recommended), then you might as well insulate your drain if it’s reasonable to do so. If there is no skirting, I wouldn’t bother because it would be a waste of effort.

IMPORTANT TIP: Do not ever under any condition leave your black water valve gate open. If you do, you will eventually have a buildup of sludge that will require a plumber to fix.

INSULATE FLOORING

Cold floors in the morning mean cold feet and that’s a bit of a buzz kill to get your day rolling. I just discovered these floor foam tiles as a solution and I love it. These tiles interlock, they are easy to clean and easy to store.

If you are still really struggling with keeping warm there are several locations where outside air can sneak in such as around doors, windows, vent fans, and slide-outs. You can use blankets to cover your slide-out gaps on the floor and the stairwell by your entry door.

HEATING INTERIOR

Propane heat is a requirement because part of what the heater is designed to do is to keep your plumbing warm. (They typically share the same spot in the cabinet.) If you want to minimize use of propane set the thermostat to 50 degrees and supplement with other sources of heat. (Electric heat might not be cheaper, but it results in a better indoor air quality.)

You will want to get a propane Extend-a-Stay attached to your propane tank, unless your tanks are removable. It’s a good idea on non-removable tanks to always keep some propane on reserve in case you run out in the middle of the night, which does happen.

Never use a portable propane heater inside an RV because you can get gas build up and using small propane bottles can be expensive, unsafe, and time consuming anyhow.

Electric heaters are a “dry heat” and propane is a “wet heat” so electric heaters will help with condensation. There are lots of space heaters you can buy and I’m not using any personally, so don’t have specific recommendations other than this one that is used by a couple that tried several. It is a Lasko 6405C. It is an oscillating ceramic heater which has a thermostat and a timer for automatic shut-off.

Excessive moisture in RVs in the winter is a common problem and can lead to mold. Every time you cook or shower, you must turn on the ventilation fans and pull that moisture out. I use a dehumidifier and as a bonus it also throws out a lot of heat. If you are regularly hitting zero degrees then you may find frost in hard to reach interior areas. Open them up as much as possible and run a fan to circulate the air.

Anytime you use a dehumidifier or electric heater, it will consume a significant amount of energy. If you run those at the same time as your microwave you could blow a fuse, so keep that in mind. You really don’t want any appliance running over 2,000 watts if you are on a 15 amp or 110 V connection. Most people will be on 30amp or 220 V and so that isn’t as great a risk, but you will certainly have higher power bills.

If lowering power bills is really important to you, consider using an electric blanket or mattress warmer at night. These are extremely energy efficient. However, you will still need minimal space heating to avoid freezing pipes.

IMPORTANT TIP: A propane detector is an ABSOLUTE must. Test and make sure it works and replace it if necessary. Propane gas always gathers at the lowest point which is why the propane detectors are placed near the point of use on the floor. Whereas smoke detectors are always placed on the ceiling or within 18 inches of it because those fumes rise.

LEVELING RV

I don’t have alot of specific advice on this, other than to say it is really important that you are level where you park.  If you aren’t level it can affect the functioning of your fridge and damage cabinetry.

I have electric hydraulic levelers on flat ground and they sunk into the dirt when the rains started.   I’m going to pick up aggregate and put it in the holes I created and see if that fixes the problem since I don’t prefer to lay an entire pad.

This is the source I used for aggregate:

  • Northstate Aggregate Inc.
  • 685 Pearson Rd, Paradise (Across from Ace Hardware)
  • Call first (530)854-0142

LEAVING FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME

When temperatures hit freezing, you have 2 options, one is to leave your heater on at least 50 degrees or if you chose not to heat your RV, you will need to COMPLETELY drain your water tanks.

To drain your tanks you can run it thru your waste system or dump it all on the ground. Dumping some water on the ground will be inevitable to get the to the bottom of your tanks. Look for the drain valve located at the lowest point in the RV, which is typically close to your fresh water.

Remember to open all the faucets till air comes out and make sure your hot water tank is empty before leaving.

FURTHER RESOURCES

You are welcome to post your questions below and I or someone in the community might have some answers for you. We also enjoy your suggestions to improve upon these ideas.

I also appreciate kind words and encouragement to continue offering this wisdom to help you with your recovery!

Basic Set-up & Being a Good Neighbor

This page was developed for renters living in RVs on land they don’t own. However most of this advice applies to any one planning to live in an RV.

To avoid potential hassle do your homework ahead of time. A little time in advance planning and some knowledge can create a more successful experience for everyone.

PLANNING WITH THE NEIGHBORS

Always check FIRST with the municipal ordinances dictated by the county or city BEFORE before you get there. You must abide by those or the situation will not be allowed to last.

Know the rules of the neighborhood. Sometimes rules posed by home owners associations (HOA) can be unfriendly to RVs. We can hope the neighbors understand that if the county is in a state of emergency, that they understand the ECONOMIC RECOVERY PROBLEM APPLIES TO EVERYONE, including those whose homes weren’t destroyed.

Never assume that just because you see other RVs in driveways and yards that this practice is allowed. The owner of that RV may have already arranged for permission. It would be wise to make friends with that person and this will create a better experience for everyone.

ARRIVAL PLANNING WITH YOUR HOST

Aside from not breaking the community rules, the number one consideration when driveway camping is will you fit? RVs come in a wide range of sizes and shapes.

Therefore, it goes without saying that a camper van is going to fit in a lot more driveways than a 45-foot motor home. While your host might assure you that there’s plenty of room, you should still ask them to measure. (Non-RVers don’t have a good grasp on how much room RVs need.) While they’re measuring for size also ask them to take note of any low hanging trees or power lines on the site and to look for the same on the driving approach to their home.

Not only do RVs take up lots of space, but they also weigh a ton (actually, most weigh several tons). Since the last thing you want is to leave unsightly marks behind, make sure your parking spot can handle the weight of the RV. This is especially critical if you plan to park in the yard or on the grass. Chances are you won’t be invited to continue staying if you tear up the lawn or crack the driveway.

Ask about the configuration of the driveway or yard. Are there any sharp turns? What about steep grades? Does the driveway have a significant dip or bump where it meets the street? Access is VERY important.

Arrive with plenty of daylight for adequate light while siting and leveling the RV. If you have to back up a hill and make a 90 degree turn, you will need lots of light and patience. Study the satellite view of the surrounding area on Google. Don’t hesitate asking for help backing in. Remember to “stop, park, get out, look, and then go.

Have a look around the site before pulling in to get a good feeling for how you want to be positioned. You RV should have the door side pointing toward the available space where you can have tables and chairs.

Show up with empty waste tanks, a full water tank, and the ability to be flexible with power usage. sometimes it can be a few days before the hook-ups are completely available.

OVERVIEW ON UTILITIES AND SET UP

Once parked, start leveling your RV. Use the built in system if you have one, otherwise you will need leveling blocks.

WATER:

  • Fresh water is the easiest utility to acquire when driveway camping. All you need is a hose long enough to reach your RV.
  • A water pressure regulator is recommended when connecting to a hose, since RV plumbing is less sturdy than house plumbing.

ELECTRIC:

  • RVs typically use what a standard household 15 amp outlet provides, but occasionally a little more when running an A/C or a microwave. This means that if you plug in, you’re going to need to be mindful of your usage and the circuit box will need to do it’s job of shutting you down until you adapt your usage.
  • You will need an adapter for a household outlet. Keep in mind that an adapter allows power to flow through the cord, but it won’t convert 15A into 30A. Therefore, conserving power and being mindful of how much power you’re using at one time is crucial, until you upgrade the electrical options. (In other words don’t expect to run the AC while blow drying your hair or running the microwave. I guarantee if you do that, your host won’t be happy.)

SEWER: This is the holy grail of RV driveway camping.

  • Unless this is a sewer outlet that is used often, check it first by dumping a small amount of clean water.
  • Make sure your connections are tight!
  • If the sewer outlet is far away, consider a product like the Sewer Solution that allows you to pump the sewage over long distances and up slight grades.
  • We think that connection to public sewer requires using a backflow device and we are looking into that now.
  • Ideally there will be no low spots and have a sloping grade to the sewer connection. You can use sewer hose supports to make that process simpler. Do NOT leave your black water tank open. This creates a problem called pyramiding and will clog your tank.

ETIQUETTE AFTER ARRIVAL WITH YOUR HOST

  • You may have brought your own house with you, but you’re still a house guest. Try to be a good guest by being considerate, communicating about expectations, and leaving your hosts a small token of appreciation.
  • Don’t overstay your welcome. (Remember that while parking in their driveway, you are most likely disrupting their normal routine.) Set expectations regarding the limit of your stay ahead of time. If you’re staying with relatives or good friends they might offer an open-ended invitation.
  • If a water hose has to stretch 50 feet across the lawn and driveway and then drape over the porch railing, get a longer hose to route it better, so it is neither a trip hazard or a visible nuisance.
  • Depending on what amenities you use, it is prudent to chip in money to cover utility costs or offer something kind in return.
  • Give thank you gifts. Their kindness toward you at this time is an immeasurable gift of comfort and security in a very difficult housing market post-fire. Aside from monetary gifts, here are a few ideas for how to thank your hosts.
    • A home cooked meal. Everyone likes to eat.
    • A trinket that makes their living experience easier or more enjoyable.
    • Offer to do some household chores. Things like mowing the lawn, weeding the garden, or cleaning the inside of their house.

ETIQUETTE WITH THE NEIGHBORS

Remember the neighbors. Keep in mind that driveway camping is not the same as staying in a campground. Chances are the neighbors are within sight and who may or may not be thrilled about the presence of an RV in their neighborhood.

How they feel about presence of the RV depends on the guest’s behavior, most of the time. Sometimes they are just grumpy neighbors. If so, this is an exercise in being nice when they aren’t. They might work out whatever their issue is, and it might not even have anything to do with you.

Try to keep the peace by being considerate.

  • Keep noise to a minimum.
  • Do not use your generator, EVER, if they can hear it. (They stink anyhow! Try solar!)
  • Keep music and other noise to a reasonable level so everyone can enjoy the serenity of their own personal space.
  • Between 8pm and 8am, don’t many any noise. Keep voices, music, and laughter to a level that won’t disturb others.
  • Don’t leave outside lights on that could shine in the neighbor’s windows, ever.
  • Keep your pets under control. That means no barking, keep pets confined to your space or on leash, and no pooping on anyone’s space without immediate cleanup.
  • Unleashed dogs often create anxiety among others dogs, small kids, or people who simply don’t like dogs. Please don’t assume because you love your dog, everyone else will.
  • Don’t leave your dog home alone in your RV, especially in the summer. It can kill them without A/C.
  • Campfires are NOT RECOMMENDED. People are very disturbed by fire right now. Even a candle. Please respect that.
  • Keep your space around you clean and tidy. Never leave trash or food scraps outside at night where it could attract animals. If possible leave it even better than when you arrived.
  • Smile. Be friendly. While you don’t need to make life long friends with everyone you encounter, make an effort to greet people with a smile when you pass by and don’t be afraid to strike up a conversation. Part of the fun of living in different environments is meeting people from all walks of life and sharing a moment.

If that all sounds helpful, reasonable and you are ready to invest yourself into this unique housing option, then please move on to the next phase of getting your new home set up.

Best wishes to you in your recovery!
~ Kimberly

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Jan. 1, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~

Selecting an RV

Buying an RV is like buying a home, not a car…

There’s lots of RV newbies out there as a result of the fire. Well over half of people’s first question when evaluating an RV is “What year?” and “How many miles does it have?” This is not a car, it’s a home that has all the same systems a traditional home has. It really doesn’t matter how old the RV is because even new ones require maintenance too, which costs the same regardless of age.

As a buyer, the 2 top questions should be “Does it have or ever had water damage?” and “Does it have a generator?” The first one is a non-starter. If it has water damage, I walk, unless the damage is minor and it was or can be easily fixed. For some people that may be all you can afford, but know you could regret it due to reduced indoor air quality and the constant stress in wet weather, as the structure will likely leak and further deteriorate.

The generator is a choice. If you know you’ll be plugged in somewhere, then it’s fine to live without. However, off-grid, in extreme temperatures you are going to want heating and cooling. So even though you could live by flashlight if you had to, you won’t want to live in an uncomfortable RV for very long.

The next thing I look for is water leaks from pipes. Turn on the water pump. Listen for the water pump for 5-10 minutes, if you hear it cycle, you have a leak. That could be something that is easy to fix (and not uncommon) or your biggest nightmare. Some leaks go undetected for a long time resulting in significant water damage and mold. If there’s a leak, depending on how well the RV was maintained, and if I can see how to fix it, I may continue inspecting it.

You are going to find stuff to fix in any RV no matter the age. What you need to decide as you find them is whether you can live with it or want to fix it. You will be evaluating systems for water and propane as well as your appliances. You should also ask to see the maintenance records and all manuals. How this is presented may reveal the owner’s care of this RV.

Major items that can be expensive when they go bad in approximate order of value: generator, fridge, A/C, entry door, furnace, water heater, awnings (partial loss), tires…

Another fundamental choice is trailer or RV? Trailers are always much cheaper, but you need a truck to tow it. Most consumer trucks are inadequate because you need a 3/4 or 1 ton truck to tow it. Otherwise count on replacing your transmission in a couple hundred miles. A proper truck-trailer combo costs more than an RV with a motor and transmission. ==> FACT. <==

Consider the HARD fact that RV mechanics will be hard to come by in the disaster zone, so DO NOT buy a trailer if you cannot tow it for service. You could be waiting weeks for a repair, which in some instances isn’t acceptable.

Also regarding the configuration besides a unit with an engine, the other big choice for full-timers is slides. They are wonderful because they add more living space. However be aware of the fact that they can get stuck open or leak. Repairs can be $5k+. If you can accept that, go for it.

Getting back to the newbie’s first question on age and mileage, which generally matter the least. Age could matter in some long term mobile home parks. If I knew for a fact I’d live in one, I’d plan accordingly. For over 90% of RV users, this isn’t going to matter.

What WILL matter is how does the unit look? And this is true EVERYWHERE you go. The age limit exists only because people don’t want to look at junky looking RVs, the age is otherwise irrelevant. In fact, if you have a great unit you are in love with, show some pictures to the park you want to be in and see if they will grant an exception.

One thing that is wonderful with older RVs is that they generally don’t decline in value. For example, a 30 year old RV can have more amenities and look just as good as a 10 year old RV. It can be just as reliable, but you won’t lose much money when sell it. =)

So the last newbie question on mileage. RVs generally are low mileage vehicles because they aren’t used for daily errands. 2-3 thousand miles a year would be normal usage range. Significantly below that tells you the RV sat alot. In that case, I’d be looking for rotten tires, belts and the like, especially if it came from Arizona (which is a common origin due to the retiree population) expect the RV to be well-baked throughout. As a general rule the RV chassis is reliable with regular maintenance of tires, oil, etc.

If in doubt about the condition of the RV you can hire 2 different types of professionals to evaluate it, one being an auto mechanic for the engine and chassis and the other being an RV specialist for the RV home features. If you are a newbie, I recommend if you hire a specialist to inspect the RV, video the inspection, and ask the RV professional to explain how the systems work.

If you can accept before buying the RV that things will break and you accept the challenge to deal with it, you’ll be fine. I’m an RVer with 15 years of experience. I am proud of having learned to fix most things myself and to appreciate the services of others when I can’t. I had no idea when I started how home systems work that I took for granted or how much energy and water is required for my comfort.

Being self contained with all the comforts I want for survival and being mobile is a wonderful experience. I am glad I took the plunge many years ago…. BEFORE my home fire and I have had many adventures to cherish. The few nightmares of ownership were quickly forgotten because nothing compares to the freedom of exploring and always knowing you have a plan B.

Wishing you well in your journey ahead,
~ Kimberly


Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Jan. 1, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~

Creating RV Hosting Agreements

This page covers”Screening Suggestions for Home Hosting Applicant” and “Typical Move-in Documents”.

These are suggestions to help you through a typical process. You can find forms on Google or from your local real estate agent.

Screening Suggestions for Home Hosting Applicant

  1. When you have found one or more suitable matches for the property, complete rental application. – There are many forms you can find on Google for this. I made this one for disasters you can use if you want.
  2. Along with a completed application, order or request a credit report. (Should be dated within the past 30 days) Bad credit won’t necessarily mean rejection for housing, as long as relations with your prior landlord were good. See AnnualCreditReport.com if needed.
  3. After receiving your application and credit history, the asset owner will verify the application. With the information provided, it is up to the asset owner to take the next steps to create an agreement.
  4. Acquire a copy of applicant’s driver’s license for each household member.
  5. Once a match is completed, the process begins to create agreements between the parties and file a temporary dwelling permit for the RV. In some cases with no utility issues, it can be issued the same week. On burned properties it can take a couple weeks to complete. Theoretically in a perfect world, getting a temporary dwelling permit is the first step in the process, but it rarely works that way.

Typical Move-In Documents

  • Month-to-Month or a Lease Agreement- Typical tenancy agreements are for land and home owners only. Not for use with RV loan agreements! It is also recommended that property owners update their homeowner’s policy and request your RV tenant to have renters insurance.
  • Receipt and Holding Deposit Agreement

For general land lord guidance I found the NOLO Press Land Lord Guide . Please be aware that if you loan an RV you could have some financial exposure. Consult your insurance agent for more details.

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Jan. 20, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~

Finding an RV Host or Offering Space

This page covers “Where do I Find or Offer Rentals?” and “What is a Fair Rental Price for an RV?”

Where Do I Find or Offer Rentals?

You are encouraged to verify and research all housing opportunities before making commitments to individual homeowners/landlords or renters.

For finding or offering RV spaces, please check these websites (Suggestions on other sites welcome.)

  • CampFire Housing: This HOA group has been doing amazing work too. Definitely check them out. They have very few local listings, but you can be assured anyone looking here is likely to be a local that is displaced. The HOA knows TurtleShells exists. We will do our best to collaborate to help you. (Click here)
  • Paradise Adopt a Family: These FB admins have been doing amazing work in connecting community! (Click here)
  • Craigslist:.
    • This link will give you a daily list of posts:(Click here) (Sorry I don’t know how to screen out the vultures. Don’t rush into selling your lot please. There’s also some unusual issues on liability to know about selling an uncleared lot.)
    • This link might help you fly over the vultures and avoid stuff that isn’t the real deal. (Click here)
  • AirBnB: Hosts have been offering discounted or free lodging. This could be a good resource. (Click here)

What is a Fair Rental Price for an RV?

I’ve given some reflection on what are fair rental prices and I hope that with some reasoned guidance, we can avoid what may be perceived as PRICE GOUGING. To report price gouging or suspected scams (CLICK HERE) for details and reporting.

First, such a rental arrangement is very much considered substandard housing. As such charging more than what is approved for a studio apartment under a local Section 8 housing program, is gouging. In Butte County that amount is $735. It seems reasonable that half that amount would be for the land and half that amount would be for RV.

So for example, if you have land to offer, but not an RV, the rent would be $368. Utilities would be additional, if full hookups are provided. There is an extremely notable exception to that rule of thumb on utilities being extra: If a contracted service truck is required to dump tanks or bring potable water, it would result in a significant decrease in the value of the land rent.

In the event that a service truck needs to be contracted, that will cost $60-80 per trip. If you have no where else to shower, that cost could easily be $150 a month to an extreme case of water delivery and tank dump on a weekly basis at $1,200 a month. In such a situation, splitting utilities might seem fair at best.

We Have a Match! What are Next Steps?

Congratulations! Please visit this next page for how to create hosting agreements.


Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Jan. 1, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~

RV Service Providers

DISCLAIMER: Any information provided below is for easing transition to emergency housing and reduction of "fire-brain" dis-ease. I do not endorse any providers, nor is any information provided complete. Business/qualification status is subject to change. Do your research on any service or person you are considering to find what works for your unique situation.

Below is information on suppliers for RV maintenance. Be sure to read about related topics on selecting an RV, optimizing comfort, RV hosting, and other general information by CLICKING HERE.


Having a trailer is cheaper, but people never think about the lack of rapid repair services after a disaster. Being able to drive anywhere for repair services can be a really big deal, depending on the repair type needed.

Please note, none of these service providers have been screened on their skills, insurance or general reputation. When there are suggested changes to this list, such as new service providers, please contact us by CLICKING HERE.

Business Name Phone Mobile Svs? Base Additional Notes
All EZ Mobile RV Service (530) 743-5164 Yes Marysville Norman
All Seasons RV Center (530) 316-5194 No Yuba City
American RV (530) 894-7755 ? Chico
Browns Valley Auto Truck RV (530)742-2595 Yes Browns Valley (Yuba City) Blane
Daddy’s Boat & RV (530) 200-1999 Yes Paradise Adam
ET Quality RV Parts & Service (530) 755-4036 ? Yuba City
Jeff’s Truck Service (530) 895-8070 Yes Chico
Mike Friend RVs (530) 343-0245 No Chico
Now It Worx Handymen (530) 764-0519 Yes Oroville Services RVs but not primary business
Ron’s RV Service (530) 345-3007 Yes Yes Chico

*All lists were assembled and confirmed to be operating via direct communication in January 2019 and re-evaluated again on May 4, 2020.  Business situations can and will change. You can contact me here regarding suggested changes.

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated May 4, 2020 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~
The links provided do not constitute an endorsement or liability for any external website or service.

Water Service Providers

DISCLAIMER: Any information provided below is for easing transition to emergency housing and reduction of "fire-brain" dis-ease. I do not endorse any providers, nor is any information provided complete. Business/qualification status is subject to change. Do your research on any service or person you are considering to find what works for your unique situation.

Below you will find information for fresh water delivery and water fill stations. For information about setting up water (CLICK HERE).

Water Delivery Service (Licensed by the State)

Company Phone
Tough Company Fire Inc. (530) 774-2384
Craig Dewsnup Trucking (530) 846-3116
Butte Water Tank Service (530) 589-0645
L & L Farms (530) 882-4343

Water Fill Stations

It is preferred to use 5 gallon jugs with an air gap for ease of filling. Free with proof of residency.

Company City Hours Address
Fire Station #55 in Bangor Bangor 7540 Oro-Bangor Hwy
Miners Ranch Water Treatment Plant Oroville 234 Kelly Ridge Road
South Feather Water & Power (SFWPA) Oroville 7:30 – 4:30 Monday – Friday 2310 Oro Quincy Hwy
Paradise Irrigation Distriction Paradise 10 am – 2 pm Monday thru Friday 6332 Clark Road

*All lists were assembled and confirmed to be operating via direct communication in January 2019. Business situations can and will change. You can contact me here regarding suggested changes.

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Feb. 1, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~
The links provided do not constitute an endorsement or liability for any external website or service.

Septic Service Providers

DISCLAIMER: Any information provided below is for easing transition to emergency housing and reduction of "fire-brain" dis-ease. I do not endorse any providers, nor is any information provided complete. Business/qualification status is subject to change. Do your research on any service or person you are considering to find what works for your unique situation.

Below is information on suppliers for public dump stations and on-site pump and dump trucks. If you don’t have onsite disposal thru a septic system or public sewer, you will need the information on this page. For general information about setting up sanitation systems (CLICK HERE).

Public Dump Stations

Company Address City Fee Hours Phone
Willow Creek Campground 17548 Highway 49 Camptonville $30.00 Call ahead (530) 288-0646
Almond Tree RV Park 3124 Esplanade Chico $10.00 9-5 Mon-Sat (530) 899-1271
Heritage RV Park 975 Hwy 99 W Corning $10.00 8:30am-5:30pm (530) 824-6130
Love’s Travel Stop 2120 South Ave Corning $10.00 24 hours (530) 824-8767
RV Park At Rolling Hills 2645 Everett Freeman Way Corning When available (530) 528-3586
Hidden Harbor Marina & RV Park 24680 Hidden Harbor Dr Los Molinos $10.00 9am-9pm (530) 384-1800
Collins Lake Recreation 7530 Collins Lake Rd Oregon House $10.00 7am-5pm (530) 692-1600
Pilot Travel Center 4444 Commerce Ln Orland $10.00 24 hours (530) 865-0108
The Parkway RV Resort 6330 Co Rd 200 Orland $10.00 Call ahead (530) 865-9188
Berry Creek Rancheria RV Park 3900 Olive Hwy Oroville $10.00 24 hours,Office in gas station (866) 991-5061
Coyote – Lake Oroville SRA 400 Glen Dr Oroville $8.00 Dawn to Dusk (530) 538-2200
Lime Saddle – Lake Oroville SRA 400 Glen Dr Oroville $8.00 Dawn to Dusk (530) 538-2200
Loafer Creek – Lake Oroville SRA Loafer Creek Rd Oroville $8.00 Dawn to Dusk (530) 538-2217
River One RV Park 751 Oro Dam Blvd W Oroville $10.00 6am-10pm (530) 533-8679
River Reflections RV Resort 4360 Pacific Heights Rd Oroville $10.00 9am-6pm (530) 533-1995
Durango RV Resorts 100 Lake Ave Red Bluff $15.00 8am-7pm (530) 527-5300

On-Site Pump and Dump Trucks

Company City Service Area Phone
Johnny on the Spot Inc. Chico From Red Bluff to Marysville to Paradise, Chico, Oroville (530) 343-6340
Ben’s Toilet Rentals Inc Gridley Up to Pulga, Berry Creek, Migalia, Forest Ranch (530) 846-4110
Gridley Septic Tank Service Gridley Gridley, Live Oak, Oroville and Biggs (530) 846-2022
A-Co Sanitation Oroville Oroville, Paradise, Chico and semi-remote locations (530) 370-8444
Alpine Portable Toilet Services Oroville Greater Oroville area in about 20 mile radius (530) 403-6599
Jerry Hegenbart Septic Tank Paradise Chico, Durham, Paradise, Migalia. Not Concow. Prefers a minimum of 2 or 3 RVs due to truck size. (530) 877-8261
Paradise Sanitation Paradise Chico, Oroville, Durham, Paradise, Migalia (530) 877-3207

*All lists were assembled and confirmed to be operating via direct communication in January 2019. Business situations can and will change. You can contact me here regarding suggested changes.

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Jan. 17, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~
The links provided do not constitute an endorsement or liability for any external website or service.

Propane Service Providers

DISCLAIMER: Any information provided below is for easing transition to emergency housing and reduction of "fire-brain" dis-ease. I do not endorse any providers, nor is any information provided complete. Business/qualification status is subject to change. Do your research on any service or person you are considering to find what works for your unique situation.

Below is information on suppliers for public fill stations or on-site propane delivery. For general information on portable propane tanks, on-site delivery, and propane safety and RV usage tips. (CLICK HERE).

Public Propane Fill Stations

Company Address City
Bangor Grocery 5704 LaPorte Rd Bangor
(S of Oroville)
8th. Valero 1295 E. 8th St Chico
All Star Rents 3291 Esplanade Chico
Coast Gas 2469 Valine Ln Chico
Dinoco Gas 2036 Forest Avenue Chico
Guy Rents 1720 Nord Ave. Chico
Kwikee Food Mart 3990 Esplanade Chico
Ledford Valero 1233 Esplanade Chico
Skyway Valero 1199 Skyway Chico
Buck’s Store 12130 LaPorte Rd Clipper Mills
(SE of Oroville)
Cohasset Country Store 8930 Cohasset Rd Cohasset
(N of Paradise)
Amerigas 1434 Hwy 99 Gridley
Fastrack 1675 Hwy 99 Gridley
Mac’s Market 550 E. Gridley Rd. Gridley
Chucks Place/Fastrip #604 14618 Skyway Magalia
A-1 Kwik Serve Food Mart 2405 Oro Dam Blvd Oroville
Alliance Food & Gas 133 Table Mt. Blvd. Oroville
Arco AM/PM-Lally 2639 Oro Dam Blvd. Oroville
Canyon Lakes Market 3610 Skycrest Dr Oroville
Cresco Equipment Rentals 2526 So. 5th Street Oroville
Eazy Stop Mkt. 3296 Foothill Blvd. Oroville
Golden Feather Market Place 751 Oro Dam Blvd Oroville
K-Gas 2770 Feather River Blvd. Oroville
Lakeside Market 5252 Olive Hwy Oroville
Quick Shop #2 (Valero) 102 Table Mt. Blvd. Oroville

On-Site Propane Delivery

Company City Phone
Suburban Propane Chico 530-342-3541
Tri-Flame Propane Chico (Temp location from Paradise) 530-342-0447
Amerigas Gridley 530-846-5662
Reliance Propane Marysville (Temp location from Paradise) 530-872-7740

*All lists were assembled and confirmed to be operating via direct communication in January 2019. Business situations can and will change. You can contact me here regarding suggested changes.

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Feb. 2, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~
The links provided do not constitute an endorsement or liability for any external website or service.

Finding Service Providers

DISCLAIMER: Any information provided below is for easing transition to emergency housing and reduction of "fire-brain" dis-ease. I do not endorse any providers, nor is any information provided complete. Business/qualification status is subject to change. Do your research on any service or person you are considering to find what works for your unique situation.

To Find RV Specific Supplies or Services, the Following May be Helpful:

Be sure to read about related topics on Temporary Dwelling Set-Up, Finding Service Providers, or RV Hosting and Living Tips.

About Hiring a Contractor…

Be advised that unlicensed individuals is common after a disaster. They pose a risk to you and your family’s financial security if a worker is injured while on your property, your property is damaged, or if the work is incomplete and/or faulty. Few, if any, unlicensed individuals have a bond or workers’ compensation insurance. The quality of their work usually doesn’t compare to that of a licensed contractor. You risk paying more in the long run.

In California, anyone who contracts to perform work on a project that is valued at $500 or more for combined labor and materials costs must hold a current, valid license from CSLB.

  • To verify a license (CLICK HERE) or call (800) 321-CSLB (2752)
  • To search for a contractor by city or zip (CLICK HERE)
  • There is help center for disaster survivors managed by the CSLB (CLICK HERE)

Information CSLB provides included contact info, when certification was issued and will expire. Contractor’s bond and workers compensation info on file. This should be re-verified upon hire.

Sole practicioners are exempt from having workers compensation insurance. They certify that they have no employees at this time, but if you have more than one person on the job ask.

What Kind of Contractor Do You Need?

CSLB licenses contractors in 44 different classifications. This ranges from general contractors to swimming pool contractors, landscapers, painters, electricians, plumbers and many more. It will be easier to decide the right type of contractor if you carefully plan your project in advance and clearly define what you want done to your property.

What is the Difference Between a General and Specialty Contractor?

General engineering and building contractors usually oversee projects and coordinate the specific licensed subcontractors for a job. Specialty or subcontractors usually are hired to perform a single job. For example, if you need only roofing or plumbing work, you may want to hire a contractor licensed in that particular specialty.

A general building contractor also may contract for specialty work, but must hold a specialty license for that work or actually have a specialty contractor do the work. The only exception is if the job requires more than two types of work on a building. Then it is appropriate for a licensed general building contractor to contract for and oversee the entire project. For example, if your kitchen remodeling will involve plumbing, electrical and carpentry work under one contract, you should hire a licensed “B” General Building contractor. Under these circumstances, a “B” contractor may perform all of the work on a building, or subcontract parts of the job to contractors with specialty licenses.


*All lists were assembled and confirmed to be operating via direct communication in January 2019. Business situations can and will change. You can contact me here regarding suggested changes.

Almost all content on this website is ORIGINAL research based on thousands of hours of work over the past 4 years post disaster… for FREE! Please credit accordingly, by referring back to this website. Tips welcome, but not required and words of kindness are ALWAYS appreciated.


~*~ Updated Feb. 2, 2019 ~*~
~ Liability Disclaimer and Community Statement ~
The links provided do not constitute an endorsement or liability for any external website or service.